A Day at the Polls in Yogyakarta

Author: Nibras Ali
Published:

As Indonesians head to the polls on 17 April, Nibras heads out in Yogyakarta to capture the sights at the polling stations.

People are voting in the home of of the village head, or Pak RT. There aren’t that many people so things are going smoothly.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

TPS 28, or Polling Station no. 28, is located inside an alley way. Signs directing voters to the TPS are hung on electric poles and walls.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

It wasn’t that exhausting to queue.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

Ballots are verified by stamping the papers.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

There are 5 ballot papers, each with columns and rows of candidates from different parties. The ballot papers are differentiated by colours. It’s really confusing to look at all those names at once.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif
Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

Four modular booths are provided for the voters make their choices. Considering the size of the ballot papers (to list all the candidates from the different parties), the booths feel too small!

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

In Ambarketawang, Yogyakarta, the polling post is located in a kampong.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

Two young women looking at the list of candidates before they go to the ballot box.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

The heat is sweltering and people can’t stand for too long as they wait.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

Pak Budi, the head of the village, announces that the polls have closed.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif
Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

A group of witnesses watch over the count.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

For the DPRD election with many candidates, the committee and witnesses have used oranges as weights. It makes the counting easier and more organised!

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

In the end, Jokowi wins in Ambarketawang’s polling station with 134 votes.

Indonesian Election in Yogyakarta - New Naratif

 

Nibras Ali

Nibras Ali is a freelance illustrator based in Yogyakarta. It's been 4 years since he took up drawing as both hobby and profession. His works mostly consist of digital illustrations. Children's book and editorial are among his subjects of choices. You can find him on Instagram at @astro.ruby.

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